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Archive for October, 2011

My Halloween Post on Kealan Patrick Burke’s Blog: My Nightly Meeting With the Grim Reaper

October 28, 2011 Leave a comment

Award-winning author Kealan Patrick Burke was kind enough to ask me to write something about Halloween for his blog.  After a week of false starts, I finally realized I had the perfect topic based on something that has been happening to me every time I’ve gone for a run this past week.

So if you’d like to read about my nightly meetings with the Grim Reaper, head on over to Kealan’s great blog — and while you’re there, please feel free to comment, say hi, and sign-up for Kealan’s updates.  He has a lot of great projects in the works.

A Preview of the UK edition of 11/22/63 by Stephen King (Photos)

October 26, 2011 Leave a comment

Today a copy of the UK hardcover edition of 11/22/63 by Stephen King, which is due out on November 8, 2011 from Hodder & Stoughton, arrived on my desk. Here are some photos for our friends across the pond:

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A Preview of 11/22/63 by Stephen King (Photos)

October 25, 2011 16 comments

A copy of the hardcover edition of 11/22/63 by Stephen King, which is due out on November 8, 2011 from Scribner, landed on my desk this week. Here are some photos of this massive new novel to whet your appetite:

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Author Justin Cronin Answers Five Frequently Asked Questions About The Twelve

October 24, 2011 6 comments

Over the weekend I asked Justin Cronin — author of the internationally bestselling novel The Passage — some of the more frequently asked questions about the sequel to that book, which is titled The Twelve and should be out in 2012 if all goes well.

Brian James Freeman: So how is The Twelve coming along?

Justin Cronin: You know that whine from under the aircraft when the pilot drops the landing gear?  The Twelve is making that sound.

BJF: You’ve mentioned that the next two books each go back to Year Zero.  Can you give a little more detail about why?

JC: Because you didn’t see everything that was going on then.  Some things you only glimpsed from the corner of your eye without knowing how important they were, how much bearing they would have 97 years in the future.

BJF: Any additional hints about the plot for The Twelve?

JC: If I’m not mistaken, I just gave one.  Here’s one more: Lawrence Grey.  Here’s another one: I like spy novels.

BJF: Will The Twelve be around the same length as The Passage?

JC: Mercifully no.  About two-thirds to three-quarters of the length.  Which is not to say it will be short.  That’s not short.

BJF: Are you traveling again to research locations, or did you cover all of that in your prep work for The Passage?

JC: I did a fair amount of travel, but mostly within Texas, and some in eastern New Mexico.  If you know eastern New Mexico, and you know The Passage, you might be able to guess why.

The Exorcist: The 40th Anniversary Revised Limited Edition Announcement

October 19, 2011 Leave a comment

UPDATE: The book sold out less than 30 hours after being officially announced!  Thanks to all of the collectors who ordered a copy!

Here is the latest news from Lonely Road Books, which I thought might be of interest:

The Exorcist: The 40th Anniversary Revised Limited Edition
by William Peter Blatty
featuring original artwork by Caniglia

Earlier this year, William Peter Blatty announced that he had revised his original manuscript for THE EXORCIST to be published as a special 40th Anniversary edition.

Lonely Road Books will be publishing a deluxe, oversized, slipcased and signed Limited Edition of this version of the book next year. This edition will feature full-color artwork by Caniglia and will be limited to just 374 copies of the Limited Edition and 26 copies of the Lettered Edition, making it an extremely collectible edition.

The Exorcist: The 40th Anniversary Revised Limited Edition

About the Revised Special Edition:
For the special 40th Anniversary Edition of The Exorcist, William Peter Blatty has returned to the manuscript, reworking portions of the book that never satisfied him. Due to financial constraints and a pressing workload at the time, he was forced to forego a desired revision. “For most of these past forty years I have rued not having done a thorough second draft and careful polish of the dialogue and prose,” Blatty says. “But now, like an answer to a prayer, this fortieth anniversary edition has given me not only the opportunity to do that second draft, but to do it at a time in my life—I am 83—when it might not be totally unreasonable to hope that my abilities, such as they are, have at least somewhat improved, and for all of this I say, Deo gratias!” Among the changes, Blatty has added a chilling scene introducing the unsettling minor character of a Jesuit psychiatrist.

About the Book:
The Exorcist, one of the most controversial novels ever written, went on to become a literary phenomenon: It spent fifty-seven weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, seventeen consecutively at number one.

Inspired by a true story of a child’s demonic possession in the 1940s, William Peter Blatty created an iconic novel that focuses on Regan, the eleven-year-old daughter of a movie actress residing in Washington, D.C. A small group of overwhelmed yet determined individuals must rescue Regan from her unspeakable fate, and the drama that ensues is gripping and unfailingly terrifying.

Two years after its publication, The Exorcist was, of course, turned into a wildly popular motion picture, garnering ten Academy Award nominations. On opening day of the film, lines of the novel’s fans stretched around city blocks. In Chicago, frustrated moviegoers used a battering ram to gain entry through the double side doors of a theater. In Kansas City, police used tear gas to disperse an impatient crowd who tried to force their way into a cinema. The three major television networks carried footage of these events; CBS’s Walter Cronkite devoted almost ten minutes to the story. The Exorcist was, and is, more than just a novel and a film: it is a true landmark.

ReservePurposefully raw and profane, The Exorcist still has the extraordinary ability to disturb readers and cause them to forget that it is “just a story.” Published here in this beautiful special Limited Edition, it remains an unforgettable reading experience and will continue to shock and frighten a new generation of readers.

About this Special Edition:
With an oversized page size and an extremely low print run, this special edition will feature a high-quality paper stock, a deluxe binding selected from the finest materials available, and cover artwork and original illustrations by Caniglia. This stunning special edition will be like no other book in your collection.

This Month’s Question: What Is The Future of Horror?

October 18, 2011 7 comments

My new feature called “The Question of the Month” over at FEARnet is a mix of “The Final Question” from Cemetery Dance magazine and also original content.

The feature has a simple premise: each month I’ll ask a handful of the genre’s authors to answer the same question and then I’ll publish their responses exactly as I receive them. In theory, this should give you some insight into how these authors think and where their work comes from.  Each month you can read the answers here on this blog or over at FEARnet.com.

This month’s question is: What is the future of horror?

Writers in pain. Their wounds, unconscious or otherwise, define the genre.
— R.C. Matheson

I don’t know what the future of horror will be, but I always live in hope that whatever it is, it’ll be a bit more subtle, quietly disturbing, surreal, and otherworldly than a lot of the trends we’ve recently seen. Something that instills genuine dread rather than aiming to shock or gross out. Not because I dislike accessible, splattery fun, but just to shake things up a bit. I’m loathe to use the word “cerebral,” but something with a bit more depth would be nice. Can we rewind to the ’80s and welcome Clive Barker as the future of horror, please? That would be grand.
— Brett Alexander Savory

The future of horror is the past–the sins of the past, that is, repressed and otherwise, which have been at the heart of virtually every horror story since Horace Walpole wrote the first gothic novel way back in 1764.
— Dale Bailey

The great thing about horror is that it doesn’t give a crap about the future or the past. It’s immune to trends. Humans will never lose interest in sex or death.
— Scott Nicholson

My hope is that horror will blaze a course through this present fascination with extreme violence without any subtext or meaning—simple shock and brutality—and start re-exploring the concepts that make the genre so powerful. Without a human element to these stories, the characters are just so many pieces of wood waiting to be hewn and chopped into kindling. If horror is to have a future beyond revolting people and making them scream with cheap scares, writers, readers and moviegoers alike need to rediscover that the best horror is about bad things happening to characters in whom we have an emotional investment.
— Bev Vincent

The future of horror is…assured.  The arc of expression seems to be following the media arc as a whole: less attention to print, more to video games and movies, but horror reinvents itself to fit.  Horror will prosper as long as people get a frisson down the spine from things that go bump in the night.
— Holly Newstein

The future of horror? The past. As always.
— Glen Hirshberg

People (or Soylent Green, if you prefer the packaging). Us.  With our capacity for feeling and inflicting pain, our reaction to mystery and the unknown, our appetite for the world and each other, we’ll be drawn to horror like lemmings to a cathartic sea for a while.  The Greeks dug it, we dig it.  However the source medium may evolve, as long as there are people, there will be both the inspiration and audience for horror.  Horror will truly be dead when we’ve split angel from demon and cast off the monsters inside us.  And we’re a long way off from that feat of genetic engineering.  Or exorcism…
— Gerard Houarner

It’s vampires who sparkle in the sunlight, like David Bowie in his sequined androgynous glam-rocker phase, or maybe it’s werewolves who crap strawberry scented sprinkles.  I’m pretty sure it’s one of those.
— Gary Raisor

What is the future of horror? WHO THE FUCK KNOWS? But I betcha we’re about to find out! (P.S.: The future of horror starts right… about… now.)
— John Skipp

Richard Chizmar speaking at the Jarrettsville Branch of the Harford County Public Library System

October 12, 2011 3 comments

Richard Chizmar will be speaking at the Jarrettsville Branch of the Harford County Public Library system later TODAY (Wednesday, 10/12/2011) at 6:30 PM.  I will most likely be tagging along.  🙂

As I mentioned in the Cemetery Dance newsletter, this will be a great chance for Cemetery Dance customers and any local writers to meet Richard in person since he rarely attends conventions these days.  The topic of discussion will be Cemetery Dance Publications and the publishing business in general.  There will be a Q&A following the presentation.

Although the library has a registration process for attending events, registration is not required.  Walk-ins are welcome.  That said, Richard will be bringing along a very cool little grab bag of freebies, so if you do register, it’ll help him know how much is needed.  I will be calling to get the final count around noon and we won’t have too much extra free stuff.

If you’re thinking of attending, here are two web pages of interest:

The library’s website page for the speaking program

More information about the library and driving directions (at the bottom of the page)

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